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67% of people in Republic of Ireland support United Ireland


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Miss Dolly

“A new opinion poll suggests that there is a substantial majority in the Republic of Ireland in favour of a united Ireland.

However the survey, by Kantor for the Irish Independent, indicates that a majority in Northern Ireland are opposed to unification.

The poll asked 1,500 people in the Republic, between the 16 and 23 April, their opinion on a united Ireland and the holding of a border poll - the margin of error was 2.5%.

The Irish Independent/Kantar poll found that that two in three polled, 67%, supported a united Ireland compared with just 16% who were opposed.

In Northern Ireland, 750 people, were surveyed on the same issue, between the 14 and 22 April - where the margin of error was higher at 3.6%.

This poll suggested that while 35% of adults were in favour of a united Ireland, 43% were against - although, significantly, one in five did not express an opinion.

Despite that difference of opinion on a united Ireland north-and-south, the survey suggests that seven in ten voters - in both jurisdictions - wanted a reunification referendum within five years.

That said, the survey also indicated a majority of people - on both side of the border – did not want to pay higher taxes to make a united Ireland a reality.” 
 

Source: https://www.rte.ie/news/2021/0501/1213202-united-ireland-poll/?fbclid=IwAR3iN2d6ZKCLOamw_GzIruyBZ-ZBzDLVv6iao9p7fFn0xwYtjhW3ce7SLBo

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With only 35% wanting that in Northern Ireland though, it won’t happen anytime soon. I can’t say I blame them to be fair, we moan about wealth inequality in the U.K. but it’s an even bigger chasm

mess era for the united kingdom

When the polls started to show a slide towards the union I started to post those threads as well.    I want all Scottish politics in one thread. I’ve asked @Admin @[email protected] For a politics

Benji

With only 35% wanting that in Northern Ireland though, it won’t happen anytime soon.

I can’t say I blame them to be fair, we moan about wealth inequality in the U.K. but it’s an even bigger chasm in the Republic.

Like with Indy Scotland etc. - If they choose to leave then there are no qualms but I don’t think there will ever be a true majority wanting it.

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Miss Dolly
1 minute ago, Benji said:

With only 35% wanting that in Northern Ireland though, it won’t happen anytime soon.

I can’t say I blame them to be fair, we moan about wealth inequality in the U.K. but it’s an even bigger chasm in the Republic.

Like with Indy Scotland etc. - If they choose to leave then there are no qualms but I don’t think there will ever be a true majority wanting it.

I don’t think so. However, the NI elections are next year and since that odious woman will be away by that point we’ll see how the Republican parties will do. 

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mess era for the united kingdom

how do you piss lady gaga off? poke her face
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Benji
1 minute ago, Miss Dolly said:

I don’t think so. However, the NI elections are next year and since that odious woman will be away by that point we’ll see how the Republican parties will do. 

Hopefully the unionist party will swing a bit more to the liberal side now she’s gone.  If the Conservatives successfully oust Johnson and try to become more central again then hopefully the DUP will follow.

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bionic
Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, Miss Dolly said:

That said, the survey also indicated a majority of people - on both side of the border – did not want to pay higher taxes to make a united Ireland a reality.” 

This is ultimately what it comes down to– at the moment NI is a financial burden that neither Great Britain or Ireland really seem to want. 

Reunion is inevitable but 'not right now'

Edited by bionic
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Miss Dolly
Just now, Benji said:

Hopefully the unionist party will swing a bit more to the liberal side now she’s gone.  If the Conservatives successfully oust Johnson and try to become more central again then hopefully the DUP will follow.

From what I’ve been reading Arlene Foster was the liberal side of the DUP. The guy that is the front runner for the DUP leader is far right. You should see some of the comments he’s made in the past. 

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Miss Dolly
1 minute ago, bionic said:

This is ultimately what it comes down to– at the moment NI is a financial burden that neither Great Britain or Ireland really seem to want. 

Reunion is inevitable but 'not right now'

My bets they will be a border polls before the end of the decade. It’ll be interesting to see what happens on Ireland. 

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bionic
1 minute ago, Miss Dolly said:

My bets they will be a border polls before the end of the decade. It’ll be interesting to see what happens on Ireland. 

Its a weird one. With Scottish independence voters seem to favor the ideal of independence over any negatives it may have. Independence is THE goal and voters seem willing to give up lots for this. Correct me if I'm wrong but ur posts make me think you share this point of view– "independence now, fix problems later".

With NI reunification voters show in opinion polls that they're a lot more pragmatic. Still generally support reunification and would like to see this happen (though support for this fluctuates a lot more than support in Scotland for independence done), but voters don't mind waiting until the 'time is right' and both Ireland and NI are in strong positions

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Miss Dolly
1 minute ago, bionic said:

Its a weird one. With Scottish independence voters seem to favor the ideal of independence over any negatives it may have. Independence is THE goal and voters seem willing to give up lots for this. Correct me if I'm wrong but ur posts make me think you share this point of view– "independence now, fix problems later".

With NI reunification voters show in opinion polls that they're a lot more pragmatic. Still generally support reunification and would like to see this happen (though support for this fluctuates a lot more than support in Scotland for independence done), but voters don't mind waiting until the 'time is right' and both Ireland and NI are in strong positions

Yeah, that is exactly my view when it comes to independence purely because we would have the power to combat those problems whatever they may be. The UK missed a massive chance to introduce federalism after 2014 into the UK for all 4 nations but we got scraps of powers. 

I don’t tend to keep up with polling in NI. Many people in NI are scared the troubles will return if they are a border poll. Am I right in saying the purpose of the Good Friday Agreement was to allow for a United Ireland at one point in the future? 

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Benji
9 minutes ago, Miss Dolly said:

From what I’ve been reading Arlene Foster was the liberal side of the DUP. The guy that is the front runner for the DUP leader is far right. You should see some of the comments he’s made in the past. 

I’ll have to check him out.  Hopefully in the next election cycle, Labour can either scrape a majority by or form a coalition with the SNP, Greens or Lib Dem’s.  I don’t want the tories to be anywhere near power, especially not with a coalition propped up by the DUP :messga:

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bionic
3 minutes ago, Miss Dolly said:

Yeah, that is exactly my view when it comes to independence purely because we would have the power to combat those problems whatever they may be. The UK missed a massive chance to introduce federalism after 2014 into the UK for all 4 nations but we got scraps of powers. 

I don’t tend to keep up with polling in NI. Many people in NI are scared the troubles will return if they are a border poll. Am I right in saying the purpose of the Good Friday Agreement was to allow for a United Ireland at one point in the future? 

The GFA and the NI Act 1998 place legal obligation in UK government to hold a border poll if "at any time it appears likely to him that a majority of those voting would express a wish that Northern Ireland should cease to be part of the United Kingdom and form part of a united Ireland"

Obviously there is a lot of academic debate about what this means in practicality but the way these treatiesa nd laws are laid out definitely makes reunificaiton inevitable

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Miss Dolly
4 minutes ago, Benji said:

I’ll have to check him out.  Hopefully in the next election cycle, Labour can either scrape a majority by or form a coalition with the SNP, Greens or Lib Dem’s.  I don’t want the tories to be anywhere near power, especially not with a coalition propped up by the DUP :messga:

I highly doubt Labour will be anywhere near power in 2024. The Tories are still over 14 points and Starmer is hardly making a dent. I thought Keir was going to be PM in 2024 but he’s went down massively in my opinion. 

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Miss Dolly
3 minutes ago, bionic said:

The GFA and the NI Act 1998 place legal obligation in UK government to hold a border poll if "at any time it appears likely to him that a majority of those voting would express a wish that Northern Ireland should cease to be part of the United Kingdom and form part of a united Ireland"

Obviously there is a lot of academic debate about what this means in practicality but the way these treatiesa nd laws are laid out definitely makes reunificaiton inevitable

The GFA kind of just stalled the reunification argument. It is the same for Scottish independence, devolution kind of just stalled Scottish Independence. The union started crumbling when the 1979 Scottish referendum failed and the rise of Thatcher. 

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bionic
Just now, Miss Dolly said:

The GFA kind of just stalled the reunification argument. It is the same for Scottish independence, devolution kind of just stalled Scottish Independence. The union started crumbling when the 1979 Scottish referendum failed and the rise of Thatcher. 

I wouldn't really compare the two given the hugely different circumstances that led to the GFA and Irish independence

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