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Tom Ford praises Gaga’s performance in House of Gucci


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  • Meat changed the title to Tom Ford praises Gaga’s performance in House of Gucci

NOW THIS....

this coming from the man himself who witnessed first-hand the gucci family empire's undoing, his word is major! honestly no-one can say anything about gaga's performance in the film because she DELIVERED. 

the haters are seething. :vegas:

you can call me signora gucci.
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I've been wondering if he would say anything! Someone Gaga knows who was actually there. I'm glad he's complimentary :diane:

I wonder if he ever met Patrizia in real life? 

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Grigio Guy

Watched this last night with my husband and my in-laws. We LOVES every second of it! My husband said it was “far better than A Star is Born”

The art of failure is interpretant of what I meant to say
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Ororo Munroe

i would love Gaga to star in his movie if he ever does new one! 

also, can you believe he's 61??! wtf?!

Edited by Ororo Munroe
I'm gonna give the gays everything they want.
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Chinosky

Copy-pasted the article, I'm not sure if allowed :koons:

Tom Ford Does Gucci

The former creative director of Gucci measures Ridley Scott’s movie about the Italian fashion dynasty that flamed out

I recently survived a screening of the two-hour-and-37-minute film that is House of Gucci. The shiny, ambitious, beautifully filmed and costumed tale of greed and murder is stunning by the sheer number of stars that have been cast. The movie rivals the nighttime soap Dynasty for subtlety but does so with a much bigger budget. Directed by master filmmaker Ridley Scott and starring Lady Gaga, Adam Driver, Al Pacino, Jeremy Irons, Jared Leto, and Salma Hayek, the film is … well, I’m still not quite sure what it is exactly, but somehow I felt as though I had lived through a hurricane when I left the theater. Was it a farce or a gripping tale of greed? I often laughed out loud, but was I supposed to?

I must preface my thoughts by stating that my opinion is perhaps biased. I knew Maurizio Gucci well and worked with him for four of the years that are covered in this film. He was murdered on the morning of March 27, 1995, just steps away from my office in Milan.

Had I not been at our offices in Florence that day, I would certainly have heard the shots that killed him. I also knew many of the other players in this saga and was interviewed on multiple occasions for the book that was the source material for the film, so it is hard for me to divorce reality from the glossy, heavily lacquered soap opera that I witnessed on-screen. As with most films based on a true story, facts are altered, characters are exaggerated, timelines warped—and, in the end, who cares as long as these alterations yield a great movie?

Maurizio was much more interesting in life than his depiction in the film suggests. He could be incredibly charming and surprisingly sexy if you caught him when he was relaxed. He had a true vision for the company but had a hard time focusing. He was mercurial. He would be in a meeting, slip into the bathroom, and come back a completely different person. He was straight as far as I know, but would spend hours in the afternoons locked in his office with his decorator and often disappeared for weeks at a time on his boat with the man. He nobly wanted Gucci to once again be the Italian Hermès of his childhood. Sadly, he was a terrible businessman, and he squeezed the company dry. He often tied up the entire design team for weeks making new uniforms for the crew of his yacht, Creole, rather than leaving us alone to design the collection.

As the on-screen Maurizio, Adam Driver, the leading man of the moment, gives a subtle and nuanced performance. He is the calm in the eye of the storm that swirls around him as his fellow actors all battle to see who can chew up the most scenery. At times, when Al Pacino, as Aldo Gucci, and Jared Leto, as Aldo’s son Paolo Gucci, were on-screen, I was not completely sure that I wasn’t watching a Saturday Night Live version of the tale. Pacino delivers a commanding but very, very large portrayal of Aldo, who by all accounts was an elegant and savvy businessman who transformed a Florentine family business into a global brand, but who had a slight aversion to paying his taxes.

Leto’s brilliance as an actor is literally buried under latex prosthetics. Both performers are given license to be absolute hams—and not of the prosciutto variety. They must have had fun. Paolo, whom I met on several occasions, was indeed eccentric and did some wacky things, but his overall demeanor was certainly not like the crazed and seemingly mentally challenged character of Leto’s performance. However, Leto as Paolo does have some of the best lines in the film and manages to actually piss on the famed Gucci Flora scarf created for Princess Grace. I was jealous of that. It was something that I always wanted to do myself, as I was constantly being asked to try to revive that damned scarf.

Jeremy Irons, as Rodolfo Gucci, Maurizio’s father, is terrific and gives a far more restrained and layered performance than his on-screen relatives. Salma Hayek is great, as always, but she’s under-utilized in her role as the television psychic Pina Auriemma, who is key in the saga. The casting of Hayek is particularly inspired given that her husband is the current owner of Gucci, a fact which will be lost on the mainstream audience.

But the true star of the film for me is Gaga. It is her film, and she steals the show. In her often over-the-top portrayal of Patrizia Gucci, her accent migrates occasionally from Milan to Moscow. But who cares? Her performance is spot-on. Her face is the thing that one can’t take one’s eyes off of. When she is on-screen, she owns the frame—not an easy task with so many seasoned and talented cast members vying for our attention. Too many, in fact.

Because of the size and star power of the cast, the screenplay is at the mercy of servicing them. One feels that some roles were expanded to simply attract and then to placate the stars. As the running time ticks by, viewers are subject to pointless and sometimes confusing scenes that seem to exist solely for the purpose of allowing the leading actors to “act.”

Under different circumstances, there is no doubt that some of those scenes would have ended up on the cutting-room floor. But because they stayed in, there is no time for the character development of the key players and thus we have little attachment to—or empathy for—any of them. The result, sadly, is a story in which we identify with no one.

Maurizio had been bought out of the company by the time I assumed the position of creative director of Gucci and had my first hit collection. He certainly never toasted me after that show as he does in the film. Movies have a way of becoming truth in people’s minds, an alternate reality that in time obliterates the reality of what was.

I was deeply sad for several days after watching House of Gucci, a reaction that I think only those of us who knew the players and the play will feel. It was hard for me to see the humor and camp in something that was so bloody. In real life, none of it was camp. It was at times absurd, but ultimately it was tragic. But with Gaga’s and Driver’s strong performances, powerful over-the-top portrayals by the entire cast, impeccable costumes, stunning sets, and beautiful cinematography, the film, I suspect, will be a hit. Splash the Gucci name across things and they usually sell.

Father, Son, and House of Cucci
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spector
4 minutes ago, Ororo Munroe said:

i would love Gaga to star in his movie if he ever does new one!

haven’t you seen this cinematic jewel?

CGfKxdZuf7n1Fy7_ESZsKf1bByy8XPzFEtYjZfNh

stella + elliot = stelliot
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Ororo Munroe
Just now, spector said:

haven’t you seen this cinematic jewel?

CGfKxdZuf7n1Fy7_ESZsKf1bByy8XPzFEtYjZfNh

damn, i only remember that he directed A Single Man. :air:

I'm gonna give the gays everything they want.
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13 minutes ago, Chinosky said:

certainly not like the crazed and seemingly mentally challenged character of Leto’s performance

omg :nooo:

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RAMROD

All the hennies, straights, bi, lesbians, and non binary alike knows Gaga holds her own in the movie :flower:

(ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ✧*:・゚ start the healing (*´艸`*) ♡♡♡
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JazzGa
34 minutes ago, Chinosky said:

Copy-pasted the article, I'm not sure if allowed :koons:

Thank you for sharing! Copypasting the whole article is actually ⁿᵒᵗ allowed 🙈 but maybe if u put it under a spoiler no one will notice 🙈

God created Adam and Eve, but Gọdga created Brian🎺 and Steve🎷
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