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Israel/Palestine Conflict Thread

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Luiz

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israeli–Palestinian_conflict  < wiki

 

Despite a long-term peace process and the general reconciliation of Israel with Egypt and Jordan, Israelis and Palestinians have failed to reach a final peace agreement. The remaining key issues are: mutual recognition, borders, security, water rights, control of Jerusalem, Israeli settlements, Palestinian freedom of movement, and resolving Palestinian claims of a right of return for their refugees. The violence of the conflict, in a region rich in sites of historic, cultural and religious interest worldwide, has been the object of numerous international conferences dealing with historic rights, security issues and human rights, and has been a factor hampering tourism in and general access to areas that are hotly contested. 

Many attempts have been made to broker a two-state solution, involving the creation of an independent Palestinian state alongside the State of Israel (after Israel's establishment in 1948). In 2007, the majority of both Israelis and Palestinians, according to a number of polls, preferred the two-state solution over any other solution as a means of resolving the conflict. Moreover, a majority of Jews see the Palestinians' demand for an independent state as just, and thinks Israel can agree to the establishment of such a state.The majority of Palestinians and Israelis in the West Bank and Gaza Strip have expressed a preference for a two-state solution. Mutual distrust and significant disagreements are deep over basic issues, as is the reciprocal scepticism about the other side's commitment to upholding obligations in an eventual agreement.

Within Israeli and Palestinian society, the conflict generates a wide variety of views and opinions. This highlights the deep divisions which exist not only between Israelis and Palestinians, but also within each society. A hallmark of the conflict has been the level of violence witnessed for virtually its entire duration. Fighting has been conducted by regular armies, paramilitary groups, terror cells, and individuals. Casualties have not been restricted to the military, with a large number of fatalities in civilian population on both sides. There are prominent international actors involved in the conflict.

The two parties engaged in direct negotiation are the Israeli government, currently led by Benjamin Netanyahu, and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), currently headed by Mahmoud Abbas. The official negotiations are mediated by an international contingent known as the Quartet on the Middle East (the Quartet) represented by a special envoy, that consists of the United States, Russia, the European Union, and the United Nations. The Arab League is another important actor, which has proposed an alternative peace plan. Egypt, a founding member of the Arab League, has historically been a key participant.

Since 2006, the Palestinian side has been fractured by conflict between the two major factions: Fatah, the traditionally dominant party, and its later electoral challenger, Hamas. After Hamas's electoral victory in 2006, the Quartet (United States, Russia, United Nations, and European Union) conditioned future foreign assistance to the Palestinian Authority (PA) on the future government's commitment to non-violence, recognition of the State of Israel, and acceptance of previous agreements. Hamas rejected these demands, which resulted in the Quartet's suspension of its foreign assistance program, and the imposition of economic sanctions by the Israelis. A year later, following Hamas's seizure of power in the Gaza Strip in June 2007, the territory officially recognized as the State of Palestine (former Palestinian National Authority – the Palestinian interim governing body) was split between Fatah in the West Bank, and Hamas in the Gaza Strip. The division of governance between the parties had effectively resulted in the collapse of bipartisan governance of the Palestinian National Authority (PA). However, in 2014, a Palestinian Unity Government, composed of both Fatah and Hamas, was formed. The latest round of peace negotiations began in July 2013 and was suspended in 2014.

 

i always see news about this conflict but sometimes i'm not sure if its thread worthy so whatever i find i'll just be posting in here :emma: 

feel free to post your own articles or just give your thoughts on the conflict .

I disapprove of what you say, but will defend to the death your right to say it.

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Luiz

Can new life be injected into the Israel-Palestine peace process?

In a recent interview with the London-based Asharq Al Awsat newspaper, Barack Obama said that the US is “taking a hard look” at its approach to the Israel-Palestine conflict and that he will “never give up hope” of achieving peace.

Mr Obama acknowledged the obstacles that persist in reaching a tangible solution: “simmering tensions in East Jerusalem and the West Bank, last summer’s conflict in Gaza, and serious questions about overall commitment to a two-state outcome. It’s no secret that we now have a very difficult path forward.”

It seems that the president realises that for as long as Benjamin Netanyahu occupies the helm of Israeli politics, a two-state solution will be almost impossible to achieve.

The president’s remarks come on the heels of concerning developments in Israeli national politics. Mr Netanyahu’s comment during the election campaign that there would not be a Palestinian state on his watch was the first bad omen. The second was the appointment of Naftali Bennett – a staunchly pro-settlement figure – to work alongside the Israeli PM, and Ayelet Shaked as justice minister. The latter is particularly concerning as it was Ms Shaked who called for the ethnic cleansing of all Palestinians during Israel’s 2014 offensive on the Gaza Strip. Such individuals make it very difficult for Mr Obama to achieve peace between Palestine and Israel.

Mr Obama’s recent comments hark back to Cairo in 2009 when he filled the hearts of many Palestinians with joy as he gave an unprecedented recognition by a US president of the “pain of dislocation” that “they have endured for more than 60 years”. In his speech, Mr Obama challenged the “legitimacy” of Israel’s continued settlement expansions.

However, despite the indefatigability of US secretary of state John Kerry, the peace plan never took off. Mr Netanyahu refused to stop settlement building. Israeli arbitrary incarcerations of Palestinians have increased and, finally, the PA has pursued member status at the UN, frustrating US efforts. In the eyes of many Palestinians, Mr Obama’s Cairo promise has faded.

Former European leaders have also written a hard- hitting letter to the EU foreign minister Federica Mogherini, saying that Mr Netanyahu’s reelection “demands a new policy” from the EU towards the occupied territories.

The letter is explicit in its recommendations that the EU take a decisive role in moving peace negotiations forward by moving away from “a reluctance to get out in front of the US in an area where Washington has always insisted on prime ownership”.

The letter links global issues to questions of legitimacy in the stillborn negotiations: “The fact that American efforts, over more than two decades have achieved virtually nothing by way of justice for the Palestinians or long-term security for Israel means that European interests have also suffered.”

It closes with policy recommendations for what it calls “a fresh approach” that include “efforts to persuade Hamas and other Palestinian factions intent on armed struggle to take a political and non-violent line from now on”.

 

http://www.thenational.ae/opinion/comment/can-new-life-be-injected-into-the-israel-palestine-peace-process

I disapprove of what you say, but will defend to the death your right to say it.

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Serendipity

I feel so bad when people fight each other

I don't want any country to fight each other

It doesn't matter who wins in the battle, the loser is humanity

Wars take away precious lives which can be lived for greater causes for the good of mankind

The world needs love, not blood

See talent here-->http://bit.ly/2eqeUxK

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HANZ

I support Israelanimated-israel-flag-image-0005.gif

My Favs = Lady Gaga, Janet Jackson, Ricky Martin, AKB48

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TiphEret

Man you took one of the most heated debate and a quite complex one!

I looked into a lot after having been to both Israel and the West bank and wow it's like the more you try to understand the less you understand !

For example, I couldn't clearly know what is the exact status of what we call Palestine. In Israel they don't call it like that, it's Israel and it's the west bank but not Palestine. That's an outsider perspective to recognize Palestine exists.

A Palestinian told me at this point you can't negotiate because you have a state recognised internationnaly versus an occupied territory that doesn't even have a proper government (division between the West Bank and Gaza that don't seem to have the same goals anyway. ).

However what is interesting is to dig in the history of Palestine, some people could be cynical saying you can't give back independance to a territory that was never independant because after the Ottoman empire, Palestine was under British mandate therefore not independant. A friend that studies Political Science also made a good point: what is Palestinian identity? Did it exists before the Nakba (exode of palestinian) and of yes how did it happened? Because Palestinian aren't like Syrian or Lebanese, yet people lived under the same empire before France and Brits split the cake. And I highly doubts they split the cake considering national identity and such.

Also people against Israel often say that Israel came and boom take over, while the first foyer of Jews are...Palestinian Jews. For sure a massive immigration had an impact which leads to Jews asking for independance that was promessed by the Brits before anyway but before independance nothing was pink and rainbow they had a lot of conflicts between Jews and Arabs...

The video makes a clear point however on how Palestinian are treated unfairly but it forgot to mention that's it's a bit tough to negotiate with two piece of land that don't have a proper government and some political figure that won't even admit Israel exists...

Sur le sable sur la neige, Sur les images dorées,Sur le front de mes amis, J’écris ton nom

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Zilla

I'm just saying, please keep the discussion civil and respectful amongst both sides. Please don't have this thread end up like the old one

𝙸'𝚖 𝚊 𝚓𝚘𝚛𝚝𝚜 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚓𝚎𝚕𝚕𝚢 𝚜𝚑𝚘𝚎𝚜 𝚔𝚒𝚗𝚍 𝚘𝚏 𝚐𝚒𝚛𝚕.

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Woolfsmck

Man you took one of the most heated debate and a quite complex one!

I looked into a lot after having been to both Israel and the West bank and wow it's like the more you try to understand the less you understand !

For example, I couldn't clearly know what is the exact status of what we call Palestine. In Israel they don't call it like that, it's Israel and it's the west bank but not Palestine. That's an outsider perspective to recognize Palestine exists.

A Palestinian told me at this point you can't negotiate because you have a state recognised internationnaly versus an occupied territory that doesn't even have a proper government (division between the West Bank and Gaza that don't seem to have the same goals anyway. ).

However what is interesting is to dig in the history of Palestine, some people could be cynical saying you can't give back independance to a territory that was never independant because after the Ottoman empire, Palestine was under British mandate therefore not independant. A friend that studies Political Science also made a good point: what is Palestinian identity? Did it exists before the Nakba (exode of palestinian) and of yes how did it happened? Because Palestinian aren't like Syrian or Lebanese, yet people lived under the same empire before France and Brits split the cake. And I highly doubts they split the cake considering national identity and such.

Also people against Israel often say that Israel came and boom take over, while the first foyer of Jews are...Palestinian Jews. For sure a massive immigration had an impact which leads to Jews asking for independance that was promessed by the Brits before anyway but before independance nothing was pink and rainbow they had a lot of conflicts between Jews and Arabs...

The video makes a clear point however on how Palestinian are treated unfairly but it forgot to mention that's it's a bit tough to negotiate with two piece of land that don't have a proper government and some political figure that won't even admit Israel exists...

​I don't know a good solution to this problem either.  But the biggest step to peace imo is to get the parties trying to kill each other separated.  Palestine and Israel can coexist without war imo ... somehow.

like a cat in a sil, I observe life, moving and still. My words give a clue,look inside to see whats true

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TiphEret

​I don't know a good solution to this problem either.  But the biggest step to peace imo is to get the parties trying to kill each other separated.  Palestine and Israel can coexist without war imo ... somehow.

Yes, but I think it's because there is no dialogue for such a long time that separation is seen as the only option. I talked to a Palestinian that said he was for a one state solution because splitting territories will always leads to disagreement. Plus a lot of Israeli are against giving Palestine independance because they see it as opening the door to other arabic country to enter and attack them. Whereas if it's all the same state they have to work together on every conflicts outside Israel. It's interesting but I don't see that happening in the near future.

Also while I was in Israel most israeli don't feel so affected or concerned, they are concerned about safety overall so including all the neighbouring countries but they don't see Palestine as a crucial problem, because it has been going for so long and they can still have a pretty normal life. Whereas the Palestinian needs the International opinion to see and know what is happening because the way they live is really unfair. Plus Israeli are more concerned with problem such as unemployemnt , welfare, housing and such something they deal with on a daily basis

Sur le sable sur la neige, Sur les images dorées,Sur le front de mes amis, J’écris ton nom

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Woolfsmck

Yes, but I think it's because there is no dialogue for such a long time that separation is seen as the only option. I talked to a Palestinian that said he was for a one state solution because splitting territories will always leads to disagreement. Plus a lot of Israeli are against giving Palestine independance because they see it as opening the door to other arabic country to enter and attack them. Whereas if it's all the same state they have to work together on every conflicts outside Israel. It's interesting but I don't see that happening in the near future.

Also while I was in Israel most israeli don't feel so affected or concerned, they are concerned about safety overall so including all the neighbouring countries but they don't see Palestine as a crucial problem, because it has been going for so long and they can still have a pretty normal life. Whereas the Palestinian needs the International opinion to see and know what is happening because the way they live is really unfair. Plus Israeli are more concerned with problem such as unemployemnt , welfare, housing and such something they deal with on a daily basis

​Yeah, the civilian Palestinians really just want jobs, a place to live, normal stuff.  The politics and land ownership are the two biggest issues.

like a cat in a sil, I observe life, moving and still. My words give a clue,look inside to see whats true

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Shadow

I still think this state can be shared. Both Israeli and Palestinian should be represented in the government and steps can be made toward peace and resolution similar how the northern and southern states reunited after the American Civil War. It has by no means been a easy transition, but improvements have been made and conditions for African Americans have come a long way, though more progress needs to be made. Not only do Israeli and Palestinian authorities, along with UN and world leaders' representation, need to go through talks, but also the leaders of the Jewish and Muslim faith could find resolution to this old issue.

Solid communication and understanding can go a long way reduce conflict to near nonexistent levels. War profits the rich and feeds off the poor, why give the rich any more blood and let them take advantage of differences to use people against each other?

in bocca al lupo

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Luiz

http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/egypt-says-it-has-discovered-521-tunnels-gaza-strip-1874990106?

Egypt says it has discovered 521 tunnels into Gaza Strip

The Egyptian army says it has destroyed the openings of more than 500 underground tunnels during a six-month military operation on its eastern borders with the Gaza Strip.

The spokesperson for Egypt’s army spoke to the state-owned daily al-Ahram in an interview published on Monday, saying that the military has discovered the openings of 521 underground tunnels connecting Egypt with the Gaza Strip.

Egypt’s armed forces began a large-scale military crackdown in the restive eastern province of North Sinai last October when a huge and highly co-ordinated militant attack killed more than 30 soldiers.

Since then, large areas of the province have been under emergency military rule, with schools closed and a strict curfew in place.

Authorities are seeking to establish a buffer zone between Egypt and the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip, fearing that militants could use secret underground tunnels to sneak fighters and weapons into Sinai.

Families have been forcibly evacuated from their homes in a kilometre-wide strip along the border with Gaza.

Thousands of houses have been demolished, with authorities saying that the openings for tunnels are often concealed in family homes.

The state-owned al-Ahram called on Monday for this buffer zone, already doubled from a planned width of 500 metres, to be extended further.

Egypt’s military spokesperson, General Mohammed Samir, said tunnels had been discovered with openings up to 2.8 kilometres from the border.

Samir also said authorities had confiscated 6,097 weapons, as well as 2,350 kilogrammes of high explosives.

With chaos reigning in Sinai, and reports that locals accused of “collaborating” with the government are frequently executed by powerful militia groups, Egypt’s President Sisi has vowed to do more to stamp out militancy in the area.

In the third of a series of monthly televised speeches on 12 May, Sisi promised that the fight against militancy in Sinai will be “comprehensive,” and will extend beyond the current military campaign.

In February Sisi promised to invest 10 billion Egyptian pounds ($1.31bn) in the isolated desert region, where residents have long complained that infrastructure is underdeveloped and opportunities are lacking.

According to government statistics, unemployment in North Sinai is estimated at 14.1 percent, above the national average of around 12 percent.

 

I disapprove of what you say, but will defend to the death your right to say it.

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Dolev

I still think this state can be shared. Both Israeli and Palestinian should be represented in the government and steps can be made toward peace and resolution similar how the northern and southern states reunited after the American Civil War. It has by no means been a easy transition, but improvements have been made and conditions for African Americans have come a long way, though more progress needs to be made. Not only do Israeli and Palestinian authorities, along with UN and world leaders' representation, need to go through talks, but also the leaders of the Jewish and Muslim faith could find resolution to this old issue.

Solid communication and understanding can go a long way reduce conflict to near nonexistent levels. War profits the rich and feeds off the poor, why give the rich any more blood and let them take advantage of differences to use people against each other?

​The Majority in both sides supports the two-states solution tho. We won't get along in one state, we're not alike enough. :deadbanana:

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Shadow

​The Majority in both sides supports the two-states solution tho. We won't get along in one state, we're not alike enough. :deadbanana:

Not alike enough? Does one have to be similar to anyone else to be civil and live in peace with those different from them?

Where I am from: Muslims, Jews, Christians, atheists, and many other groups, faiths, or ethnics live very different lifestyles, look and live differently in many ways, yet coexist.  Not exactly utopia, peace on Earth, or euphoric dream, but if given the right settings and governing supervision (though I am not a fan of controlling authorities) people can survive and even thrive in a mutual state.  

However, if the two state solution is the only way for people to live in peace there, then have at it.

in bocca al lupo

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Melech

Not alike enough? Does one have to be similar to anyone else to be civil and live in peace with those different from them?

Where I am from: Muslims, Jews, Christians, atheists, and many other groups, faiths, or ethnics live very different lifestyles, look and live differently in many ways, yet coexist.  Not exactly utopia, peace on Earth, or euphoric dream, but if given the right settings and governing supervision (though I am not a fan of controlling authorities) people can survive and even thrive in a mutual state.  

However, if the two state solution is the only way for people to live in peace there, then have at it.

​it's not everywhere like in the USA. The history between Israelis and Palestinians is way to long. Palestinians kids basically getting educated to hate Israel. 

The Israelis and the Palestinians don't have much a like. Just look at social issues like homos-xuality or even woman rights. 

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RAMROD

I wish we can all eat shawarma together in peace.

tumblr_me41rl1hpB1ql5yr7o1_500.gif

 

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