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opinion

Biggest music sellouts?

brizoda
3 hours ago, PsychoMaxcara said:

In their defense, they did have some Latin influence on their past albums so them chasing the trend now with the Latin wave seems more like them coming a full circle after diverging so much with the electropop I Gotta a Feeling sound.

Also, Taboo (the hot dude with the long black hair) has Mexican roots, so :huntyga: 

 

The problem is that the new songs are atrocious

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Freddy

The Offspring :bear:

From a respected rock/punk band to 'Pretty Fly for a white guy' :bear:

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JINNOCIDE

I feel like Sia is putting the same record again and again after 'This is Acting' and A LOT of same vibe-y songs in a short period of time. This is just a guess of mine, because I didn't even heard her recent material. Guess I'm a sucker for We Are Born and 1001 Forms of Fear.

Also let's take a time to remember that people change and we don't know **** about the industry :selena:

Gaga changed direction (and was not the first nor the last) for Joanne and no one's calling her a sell out (well...), so that can happen to anyone.

And there's the cases where some are forced to release trendy materials...

Edited by JINNOCIDE
STAN RINA SAWAYAMA
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FentyGa

katy perry, maroon 5, j-lo, madonna lowkey

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Ronk
8 hours ago, tomsches said:

No. Artists do what they think is art and what they themselves enjoy. Doing what you think other people will enjoy is the definition of selling out. 

I agree that artists do what they think is art and what they themselves enjoy.  But many artists enjoy and have the artistic capability to produce more than one narrow style.  I don't see it as selling out for an artists to choose what will appeal to the widest audience.  If an artist actually disliked something and did not consider it good art yet produced it anyway, I think that would be selling out.  But every artist is a person and has influences and considerations, and I don't believe in dragging artists or anyone else, for that matter.

In my dorm room my roommate and I would listen to Dylan's first three albums when they were released.  They were vinyl.  I still have them.  Those folk songs he performed solo on acoustic guitar and harmonica were what his fans loved.  Yet at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival Dylan went electric.  He was booed by his own fans.  But he was following his own artistic vision and he never looked back.  Dylan was the polar opposite of selling out.  If I was in the audience for that Newport concert I would have booed too.  I would have been wrong.  I should have cheered him for following his vision.

 

I live in an alternate universe.

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Jaume
21 hours ago, Anveeroy said:

 

Well, Kylie's first four albums are the very good example of sell-out; not her post Impossible Princess-era. I agree with @Lord Temptation. Kylie found her voice in KM94; and later IP didn't work out because numerous reasons ARTPOP couldn't. Artists have successes, and failures. Kylie came back with Light Years, and succeeded. Calling sell-out her after 1997 isn't right, she was still struggling to establish herself as a musician. 

Just one note: Her second self title contains 'Confide in Me' - which is a career highlight. 

That is not right.

Her first 4 albums cant be sellout because she she was told what to do, what to wear, what to sing. In fact, that happened strictly with her first 2 albums. On her third, Rythm of love, she got a little bit of control and got a sexier image. On her fourth, Let's Get to it she co-wrote half of the album. When she left her first label, SAW, she signed with Deconstruction. She tried to find a more mature sound, she tried to find a new sound but  it didnt do well... KM wasnt very successful although  Confide in Me was #2 in the UK for several weeks. The album  had like 3 covers, wasnt cohesive because she wanted  to get in the US market and tried to  find a more r&b sound  but couldnt find a label. A mess.

With Impossible Princess she showed she could write good songs and talk about other things than love... but it flopped hard. The worst part is that she said she was embarrassed  of her early songs and she didnt want to sing them again ... later on that year she went on tour and sang her first hit songs. 

She played safe with her next album in a new  label, Parlophone, and went 100% pop again.

After the massive success  of Fever, she tried for the last time to do something different with Body Language but it didnt work out... so she has been doing pop since  2004.   Sellout or not... I dont know... I guess she realised that  the public just wanted her to do pop and she has not even tried to experiment  anymore which is sad. I enjoy her music a lot but it is a pity she gave up on trying new things. 

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Sexxx

the weeknd tbh

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StrawberryBlond
On 10/17/2020 at 1:13 AM, Chromatican said:

How can any of these artists be called sellouts? All of them debuted and were marketed as mainstream pop acts. My understanding of a sellout is someone who is alternative and switches lanes to pop suddenly after a new record contract or to gain more hits. The only people capable of being sellouts are people who aren’t mainstream popstars who “sold out” at the very start. 

That's just one way of selling out but there's more than one way to sell out and anyone can do it. You can be mainstream and still sell out. If you deviate from your sound that made you popular and what your fans love in order to fit in with current trends, that's selling out. You're risking losing your original fans in order to get new ones who just like your trend-hopping and will probably drop you fast. I pointed out artists who change their sound with every album to reflect the current trends. That's the very definition of selling out. And it's also selling out to abandon an album the instant it doesn't gain the success you hoped and then immediately chase it with a trend-hopping album.

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Marjol
On 10/16/2020 at 10:08 PM, Lord Temptation said:

How was Hard Candy a sellout? Nobody wanted her to do it and hip hop was and still is notoriously a very guarded community. I think it was a huge gamble for Madonna to make a hip hop heavy album. Admittedly many pop girls of the 2000s were dabbling in hip hop (Gwen, Nelly, Fergie) but with Hard Candy it still felt like an authentic Madonna album, rather than a Timbaland album or Pharrel album with Madonna just as a muse for those producers. And I love how she literally did a complete 180 degree turn from Confessions! 

At the time I was a Madonna fan and I felt with Hard Candy she wasn't ahead with her sound, but falling behind. By the time it was released people were over that particular Timbaland Timberlake sound. Also the music video's felt really uninspired compared to her previous work. This album felt too desperate to me and I found her aesthetics a bit tacky so personally I was done with her at that time. I wish it had been a little bit more experimental and creative.

Edited by Marjol
According to Gaga I'm a ****ing rad bitch
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Lord Temptation
44 minutes ago, Marjol said:

At the time I was a Madonna fan and I felt with Hard Candy she wasn't ahead with her sound, but falling behind. By the time it was released people were over that particular Timbaland Timberlake sound. Also the music video's felt really uninspired compared to her previous work. This album felt too desperate to me and I found her aesthetics a bit tacky so personally I was done with her at that time. I wish it had been a little bit more experimental and creative.

I can understand and respect that perspective. Notwithstanding the trip hop and R&B influences in Bedtime Stories already a decade earlier in 1994, Hard Candy had arrived at the tail end of a decade of female pop stars experimenting with hip hop (Pink in 2000, Nelly Furtado in 2001, Kylie in 2003, Gwen in 2005 and Fergie in 2006). 

But I also like how she pushed Pharrel/Timbaland & Kanye to outside their comfort zones. The 2000s was all about a mashup of genres: I feel like Hard Candy sits right at the intersection of 2000s indie hip hop, indie rock and indie dance. And her aesthetic is very humourous and self-referential to me. Almost an homage to Keith Haring’s graffiti art and the no wave Downtown scene in the 1980s. I get why people hated it but I still love the campiness of it all. Remember that the album was originally to be called Black Madonna - I wish she kept that name. I love Madge when she makes fun of herself. This was her “bigger than Jesus” moment. Hard Candy is to Confessions what Achtung Baby is to The Joshua Tree. 

At the same time, i kind of wish she went acoustic in her follow up, instead of that EDM album MDNA. By then she was just repeating herself but without the fun. MDNA is like Hard Candy but with a straight face. So i think of Hard Candy as her last good and original album. 

Edited by Lord Temptation

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Runway

Nicki Minaj when she called RedOne, Dr Luke and David Guetta, only to drop the popstar persona as soon as Hip Hop became popular again :bear:

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efrs
On 10/16/2020 at 3:30 PM, Bambino said:

Shakira: She radically changed her look to fit into the stereotypical blonde pop star upon her crossover to the US and international markets. Go look up what she looked like before the Laundry Service era. She basically became a copy of Britney/Xtina/Jessica and every other blonde diva. She kept her voice and Latin roots though.

Thalia: She made great music in the 90's and early 00's but recently all she's been doing is looking for trendy artists to record a floppy reggaeton duet with, hoping to get another #1. It's becoming very repetitive and she's losing her creativity and authenticity as an artist.

Enrique Iglesias: Same as Thalia.

I'm holding out hope that one day Shakira will dye her hair black and red and give us another donde estan los ladrones 

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