Jump to content
Stefani Tee

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Police Issues and Racial Profiling Protest Discussion

Featured Posts

uo111

How about quote the part where it says the police officers were not told it was probably fake.

Drawing a gun is considered force and pointing a gun is considered lethal force. When a gun has been pointed at you, you don't have time to ask, "hey, why are you pointing that gun at me?"

If people who hated guns took time to actually understand them, and read up on a situation without relying on myths and assumptions like, "shoot for the legs," then maybe their arguements would be easier to take seriously.

Bottom line is that a 12 year old with a gun is just as dangerous as a 21 year old with a gun.

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
EXCXSXE

I don't think that taking this child's life was a good or respectable thing AT ALL. But there are precautions an officer in America has to take that wouldn't be so in other parts of the world. 

 

I do not condone violence or promote the use of firearms but I do think that both the child and the officer were at fault.

 

You may have "owned lots of toy guns" but surely you didn't wave them around and use them to frighten other children and you probably wouldn't have reached for it in the presence of an armed police officer. 

 

I can just tell by the story that this kid was trying to be "cool" and "gangster" and he wanted to put a little scare into the local towns children and in the end it cost him his life. Sad, really. 

 

How about quote the part where it says the police officers were not told it was probably fake.

Drawing a gun is considered force and pointing a gun is considered lethal force. When a gun has been pointed at you, you don't have time to ask, "hey, why are you pointing that gun at me?"

If people who hated guns took time to actually understand them, and read up on a situation without relying on myths and assumptions like, "shoot for the legs," then maybe their arguements would be easier to take seriously.

Bottom line is that a 12 year old with a gun is just as dangerous as a 21 year old with a gun.

 

Agree with you guys. The police officer did the safest thing for himself, which is an unfortunate reality of that job. This is a tragedy; there's no right or wrong, and there's no justice. It's just something horrible that happened. Everyone (officer included) is devastated by this, I'm sure. :(

 

This has nothing to do with police brutality, it's just a sad story with a small lesson: guns should NEVER be toys. 

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
darkwolf

How about quote the part where it says the police officers were not told it was probably fake.

Drawing a gun is considered force and pointing a gun is considered lethal force. When a gun has been pointed at you, you don't have time to ask, "hey, why are you pointing that gun at me?"

If people who hated guns took time to actually understand them, and read up on a situation without relying on myths and assumptions like, "shoot for the legs," then maybe their arguements would be easier to take seriously.

Bottom line is that a 12 year old with a gun is just as dangerous as a 21 year old with a gun.

 

How about the part where it says he didn't threaten or point the fake gun towards them?

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
uo111

How about the part where it says he didn't threaten or point the fake gun towards them?

"Drawing a gun is considered force and pointing a gun is considered lethal force. When a gun has been pointed at you, you don't have time to ask, "hey, why are you pointing that gun at me?""

 

I acknowledged that in the very next line...

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
EXCXSXE

How about the part where it says he didn't threaten or point the fake gun towards them?

 

He was waving it around prior to the police officer arriving, and the article says people in the park were scared. I'm imagining there was some kind of scene. Otherwise, I'm imagining a dumb-as-**** judgemental person who has a lifetime of guilt ahead of them. 

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
darkwolf

"Drawing a gun is considered force and pointing a gun is considered lethal force. When a gun has been pointed at you, you don't have time to ask, "hey, why are you pointing that gun at me?""

 

I acknowledged that in the very next line...

Well I suggest you look up the verb "to point"...do it, look it up :reductive:

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
uo111

Well I suggest you look up the verb "to point"...do it, look it up :reductive:

Are you even reading what I said...

 

I'll make it more clear I guess. You don't wait until they point the gun at you.

 

Does that help to clarify things?

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
EXCXSXE

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2014/11/tamir_rice_shooting_latest_upd.html

 

2:08 p.m. - At the press conference this morning, police said Rice and the officer were less than 10 feet apart at the time of the shooting.

Last night, Rice's father Gregory Henderson told our Cory Shaffer, "Why not taze him? You shot him twice, not once, and at the end of the day you all don't shoot for the legs, you shoot for the upper body," Henderson said.

1:37 p.m. - Northeast Ohio Media Group reporter Evan MacDonald is answering your questions about the shooting here. For example:

Q: What regulations govern the sale or possession of imitation firearms in Ohio and in Cleveland?

A: Ohio law prohibits persons under age 18 from owning or possessing firearms, but neither state law nor federal law defines airsoft guns as firearms.

In Cleveland, it is illegal to sell "replica or facsimile firearms," including air guns. The law does not apply to a device that is distinctly colored, has an exaggerated size, or has a design feature that makes it appear different from a real firearm.

It is also illegal in Cleveland to draw, exhibit or brandish such a device in the presence of a law enforcement officer, or to "frighten, vex, harass or annoy" another person.

12:46 p.m. - Tamir Rice's family declined to see video of the shooting, Cory Shaffer reports. Read his 5 takeaways from this morning's press conference here.

12:38 p.m. - Congresswoman Marcia Fudge offered condolences to the Rice family and urged the Department of Justice to get involved, reports Sabrina Eaton.

"With the long awaited report by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) into the use of deadly force, racial discrimination and police pursuits by the Cleveland Division of Police expected soon, I urge DOJ to review this incident and continue monitoring the Police Department," she said in a release.

12:30 p.m. - Cleveland City Councilman Zack Reed says if Cleveland police had been equipped with the body cameras council approved in October, there would be fewer unanswered questions about this shooting, Ryllie Danylko reports.

12:25 p.m. - Tamir Rice did not have a juvenile criminal record, Brandon Blackwell reports.

12:15 p.m. - The tragedy should provide a teaching moment for parents and children, child psychologist at Case Western Reserve University Dan Flannery told our Patrick Cooley.

"This is why we talk about not carrying around real-looking (replica) guns to begin with," Flannery said."That's the conversation I'm going to be having with my 12-year-old daughter."

12:10 p.m. - The hashtag #TamirRice is picking up steam on Twitter. See some of the tweets and photos being posted on social media here.

12:01 p.m. - Williams said the video and scientific evidence will show exactly what happened. "There's no time a Cleveland police officer wants to shoot a kid and that's how the officer feels."

11:58 a.m. - Jackson and Williams are asked if they're prepared for potential violence in light of what's happening in Ferguson, Mo.

"We're always prepared for whatever comes," Jackson said.

"The division always has a contingency plan for Ferguson and we have a plan for this," Williams added.

11:50 a.m. - Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Timothy McGinty agrees with Tomba that the video will not be released at this time. He then reads the prosecutor's office policy regarding investigations into the use of deadly force by a police officer. Short version: their findings will be presented to the Grand Jury.

11:45 a.m. - Cleveland Police Deputy Chief Edward Tomba reveals there is video evidence of the incident and that the department will complete its investigation in 90 days.

When pressed about the video and if it will be released, Tomba said, "It's part of an ongoing investigation. Our main concern is our community, the family and the officer."

"We have to be sensitive to them before we decide what to do with it."

Tomba does reveal the officer and the boy were less than 10 feet apart at the time of the shooting. He won't release the name of the officer. Tomba says they've only talked with him briefly so far.

He also says he's not sure if dispatchers told the officers the gun may have been fake.

11:40 a.m. Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams takes the podium and also expresses condolences to the boy's family.

His main message: "Guns are not toys and we need to teach our kids that," Williams said. "The facsimile weapon in this incident is indistinguishable from a real firearm."

11:35 a.m. - The press conference begins 35 minutes late. Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson makes the opening statement.

"My condolences to the Rice family for the loss of their child," Jackson said.

"There's nothing I could say that would be adequate for the suffering and pain they're going through."

11 a.m. - There are two rallies for Tamir Rice planned for today. At 3 p.m., the group Puncture The Silence is organizing a rally at Public Square. Family and friends will reportedly gather at Cudell Rec Center, Detroit and West Boulevard, at 5 p.m.

8 a.m. - The hacktivist group Anonymous is claiming responsibility for taking down the city of Cleveland's website overnight. In a video message posted on YouTube, Anonymous charges that an "untrained rookie officer" shot Tamir "in cold blood," and asks why the officer did not Taser the child.

7 a.m. - In case you missed it, listen to the 9-1-1 call received from outside the rec center around 3:30 p.m. on Saturday. The caller reported seeing "a guy with a pistol" on the swing set pulling the weapon from his pants and "scaring the s--t out of everyone."

9-1-1 call
"There's a guy with a pistol, and it's probably fake," he said quickly, "but he's pointing it everybody."

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
uo111

I don't get why a criminal record would matter for a child (or anyone for that matter). As though that would give them more reason to shoot him? That argument doesn't make any sense. Past criminal records don't factor into these shootings. The only way they might is if right wingers use that as an argument for why the shooting wasn't so bad which is just really inhumane.

 

I always feel like people misinterpret my views because I come to the defense of police officers in these cases. So I'll further explain my thoughts on the subject.

 

We do not need to send police officers to jail or condemn them for following the rules that are put in place for them to follow in order to minimize risk to themselves and bystanders. Rather, we should change the rules to ones that also minimize the risk of death to the perpetrator whenever possible.

 

We need to have our police officers using tasers first and we need stricter gun laws than we have. Replica guns that look like real guns should absolutely be illegal. I feel like those things are obvious. But until that happens, we can't punish the police officers for following the rules that they have been trained and sworn by.

 

Also, we shouldn't forget that everyone in these situations are human beings and deserve to be treated as such. Which is something a lot of people forget about when talking about the police officers. This quote sums it up perfectly.

 

 

"There's no time a Cleveland police officer wants to shoot a kid and that's how the officer feels."

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
EXCXSXE

I don't get why a criminal record would matter for a child (or anyone for that matter). As though that would give them more reason to shoot him? That argument doesn't make any sense. Past criminal records don't factor into these shootings. The only way they might is if right wingers use that as an argument for why the shooting wasn't so bad which is just really inhumane.

 

I always feel like people misinterpret my views because I come to the defense of police officers in these cases. So I'll further explain my thoughts on the subject.

 

We do not need to send police officers to jail or condemn them for following the rules that are put in place for them to follow in order to minimize risk to themselves and bystanders. Rather, we should change the rules to ones that also minimize the risk of death to the perpetrator whenever possible.

 

We need to have our police officers using tasers first and we need stricter gun laws than we have. Replica guns that look like real guns should absolutely be illegal. I feel like those things are obvious. But until that happens, we can't punish the police officers for following the rules that they have been trained and sworn by.

 

Also, we shouldn't forget that everyone in these situations are human beings and deserve to be treated as such. Which is something a lot of people forget about when talking about the police officers. This quote sums it up perfectly.

 

I absolutely agree with all of this. 

You unfortunately have to protect yourself in this world.

I think the company who made the toy should be sued, and the police officer should be investigated further to ensure the situation was handled properly. Other than that, this is just another sad story. 

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
lego

Ferguson grand jury word expected soon

After months of waiting, this question should be answered soon: Will Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson be indicted for killing teenager Michael Brown?

State and federal sources told CNN the grand jury decision will be announced some time Monday. The prosecutor's office said that a decision has been reached, but news of what that is will come later in the day.

People in this St. Louis suburb have been waiting since August 9, when Brown, 18, was fatally shot by Wilson.

The killing ignited a national debate on race and law enforcement. Nowhere was the tension more evident than in the predominantly black town of Ferguson, which has a mostly white police department and town government. Brown was black, Wilson is white.

Supporters of Brown's family back witness accounts that Wilson fired while Brown had his hands up in surrender. Wilson's supporters say that Brown was the aggressor and had tried to take Wilson's gun while he was in his vehicle and that the officer fired in self-defense.

The town couldn't even agree what happened during weeks of street demonstrations. Protesters argued that authorities were trying to stifle protests; officials said they were acting to keep violence under control.

Brown's family is asking for four and a half minutes of silence before any protests begin, family representative Janie Jones said.

"We are not here to be violent. We are here in memory of our son. We are here for protection of all children. We are here to support justice and equality for all people. We lift our voices to ensure black and brown men, women and children can live in this country without being devalued because of the color of our skin," the family said in a statement.

The time period is a reference to the approximately four and a half hours Brown's body remained in the street after he was shot.

An investigation by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch found that county detectives were 30 miles away when they were called, and the first detective arrived about 90 minutes after the shooting. When a hearse later arrived, an angry crowd had gathered and it was too dangerous to get the body, authorities said. Ultimately, a SWAT team came.

'We're just ready for it to be over with'

The city has been on edge in anticipation of a decision. Law enforcement sources said the grand jury has been sent home.

"We're prepared for any decision that comes down," Missouri Public Safety Director Daniel Isom told CNN.

More businesses boarded up, but streets were quiet in the afternoon as residents waited.

Byron Conley, protesting outside city police department, told CNN, "We're just ready for it to be over with. Let's get on with our lives."

Rick Canamore stood with his sign -- "RIP Mike Brown" -- outside the police department.

"I'm already angry because it has taken so long," he said. "If Mike Brown had shot Darren Wilson, it would have been over a long time ago. But Darren Wilson is walking around free. He hasn't apologized to Mike Brown's family. He has not apologized to the community."

Though the basic facts of the case -- that Brown was unarmed when Wilson shot him -- are not in question, the facts of the fatal moment are hotly disputed. Authorities have said Wilson stopped Brown because Brown and a friend were blocking traffic, by walking down the middle of the street.

Protests in Ferguson might be hampered by winter weather, with temperatures expected to drop into the upper 20s Monday night.

The Ferguson-Florissant School District has canceled classes and activities for Tuesday as a result of the expected grand jury announcement. The district's calendar shows the schools will be closed from Wednesday through Friday for Thanksgiving.

Unrest could flare in other cities, too, in the wake of the grand jury decision, Rashid Abdul-Salaam, a security specialist and former police officer, told CNN.

"Departments would be remiss if they didn't prepare," he said.

Unanimous indictment decision isn't needed

Unlike a jury in a criminal case, which convicts someone if jurors are convinced of guilt "beyond a reasonable doubt," a grand jury decides whether there is "probable cause" to charge someone with a crime, based on testimony and evidence presented.

In Missouri, grand jurors don't have to be unanimous to indict, as long as nine of the 12 agree on a charge.

The grand jury can issue an indictment on any of these four charges: First-degree murder, second-degree murder, voluntary manslaughter and involuntary manslaughter. It also can add a charge of armed criminal action, authorities said.

But the grand jury, which received the Missouri statutes for self-defense and the police use of deadly force, may choose not to indict Wilson.

The grand jury meets in secrecy and first met in August. While the jury members are not identified, authorities have released some information about them.

The group of 12 includes nine white people (six men and three women) and three black people (two women and one man), court officials said.

The county grand jury was randomly selected from an approved pool and has been seated since May, according to Paul Fox, director of judicial administration for the St. Louis County Circuit Court.

Many grand juries hear numerous cases. These juries last for a specified period of time rather than the duration of a specific case.

Wilson himself testified before the grand jury, CNN legal a--lyst Jeffrey Toobin said, an unusual move because he gave up his Fifth Amendment rights in doing so.

http://www.cnnmobile.com/latest/2014/11/24/ferguson-grand-jury-word-expected-soon?fullarticle=true

It's not easy love, but you've got friends you can trust

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
Morphine Prince

They will announce the decision at 9PM Eastern. Two more hours. 

The friends I've had to bury, they keep me up at night

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
No Angel

I love how they completely dragged this on. We know how it will go. Wilson won't get indicted. The funny thing is, Brown's family found out that they reached a decision on television. :fail:

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jonna Lee

at 9PM we will be able to the smoke rising all the way from missouri

i like it when u treat me mean it turns my mood from black to blue

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
Morphine Prince

I love how they completely dragged this on. We know how it will go. Wilson won't get indicted. The funny thing is, Brown's family found out that they reached a decision on television. :fail:

Seriously. Do they even care about that family? They should have been the first informed.

The friends I've had to bury, they keep me up at night

Share


Link to post
Share on other sites
×
×
  • Create New...