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science

Ghost forests are creeping along NC’s coast

HuffsAhoy
Posted (edited)

I read this fascinating article from one of the state's large newspapers this morning and I thought I'd share it with you all. It basically talks about how the continued climate crisis has started to push more and more salt water into freshwater forests; which increases salinity and leads to the phenomenon known as ghost forests. 

Dead. Pale. Devoid of limbs.

No, not the stars of horror stories, but families of trees sprawled across America’s East Coast that are being swallowed by swarms of salty ocean water.

Scientists call them “ghost forests” — and they’re becoming more common as human-driven climate change paves the way for more frequent extreme weather events that cause abrupt environmental changes nearly impossible to recover from.

They’re also getting bigger. So much so, the barren land can be seen from space.

One particular forest in North Carolina within the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, home to endangered animals and unique wetlands, has lost 11% of its tree cover due to rising sea levels since 1985, according to a Duke University study published Sunday in the journal Ecological Applications.

https://www.newsobserver.com/news/state/north-carolina/article250494144.html?fbclid=IwAR3le9lB7z2yDeiKzzkUzfYta7fzucbckIh72AmTrYKky2Fw0aP8YyPUlI8

YouTube video link in case the article gets put behind a paywall 

 

Edited by HuffsAhoy
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Frybean
Posted (edited)

Thanks for sharing this video and serious topic to us!

This is the first time I heard about these "ghost forests", before this, I only know the intense storms part. I guess It reminds me that climate change wasn't only about the notable great disaster, but also things like this that normal people wouldn't even notice (which will also become notable great disaster in the future.)

Edited by Frybean
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HuffsAhoy
52 minutes ago, Frybean said:

(which will also become notable great disaster in the future.)

Yes. This area produces a lot of agriculture for this region (which is one of the poorest in the state) and the introduction and increase of salt into the soil will have devastating impacts on what can be effectively grown. 

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Neroneau

Thanks for sharing this :c 

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Frybean
1 minute ago, HuffsAhoy said:

Yes. This area produces a lot of agriculture for this region (which is one of the poorest in the state) and the introduction and increase of salt into the soil will have devastating impacts on what can be effectively grown. 

It's kinda reminds me the over-pumping and over irrigation :messga:

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HuffsAhoy
Just now, Frybean said:

It's kinda reminds me the over-pumping and over irrigation :messga:

The sad thing is that back in the colonial period and late 19th century, they had to dig canals in order to drain some of this land to make it suitable for farming and to allow for natural irrigation (from near by rivers). Now those canals are doing the opposite, instead of helping the wetlands, they are acting as "interstates" per say and letting sea water flow much more easily inland. 

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Frybean
3 minutes ago, HuffsAhoy said:

The sad thing is that back in the colonial period and late 19th century, they had to dig canals in order to drain some of this land to make it suitable for farming and to allow for natural irrigation (from near by rivers). Now those canals are doing the opposite, instead of helping the wetlands, they are acting as "interstates" per say and letting sea water flow much more easily inland. 

The future we got :smh:

Also thanks for making me feel like I'm talking with a magical old lady who full of wisdom.

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Luna Lovegood

It’s beautiful but man this is unfortunate and depressing **** climate change 

luna’s advocate
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the Devil of Pop

In North Carolina, there is a nature reserve called the Black River Delta Preserve. It is home to the oldest trees on the East side of the Mississippi. Some of these bald cypress swamp trees are estimated to be more than a thousand years old, rivalling their famous Redwood cousins out West. 

The Black River Delta wetlands are under imminent threat from rising sea levels. As you can imagine, rising seawater will affect a swampy river bottom first. The ancient trees might not be around to continue their thousand-year paths much longer. Because of this, my brother and I are planning a canoe trip for this summer to paddle out and go see them! Thanks for sharing, fellow tree-lover. 

https://www.ncparks.gov/why-the-black-river-so-special

How can I protect something so perfect without evil?
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NCgaga
38 minutes ago, the Devil of Pop said:

In North Carolina, there is a nature reserve called the Black River Delta Preserve. It is home to the oldest trees on the East side of the Mississippi. Some of these bald cypress swamp trees are estimated to be more than a thousand years old, rivalling their famous Redwood cousins out West. 

The Black River Delta wetlands are under imminent threat from rising sea levels. As you can imagine, rising seawater will affect a swampy river bottom first. The ancient trees might not be around to continue their thousand-year paths much longer. Because of this, my brother and I are planning a canoe trip for this summer to paddle out and go see them! Thanks for sharing, fellow tree-lover. 

https://www.ncparks.gov/why-the-black-river-so-special

Yes! Some of those trees we’re around when Jesus walked the earth. Insane. 

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HuffsAhoy
48 minutes ago, the Devil of Pop said:

In North Carolina, there is a nature reserve called the Black River Delta Preserve. It is home to the oldest trees on the East side of the Mississippi. Some of these bald cypress swamp trees are estimated to be more than a thousand years old, rivalling their famous Redwood cousins out West. 

The Black River Delta wetlands are under imminent threat from rising sea levels. As you can imagine, rising seawater will affect a swampy river bottom first. The ancient trees might not be around to continue their thousand-year paths much longer. Because of this, my brother and I are planning a canoe trip for this summer to paddle out and go see them! Thanks for sharing, fellow tree-lover. 

https://www.ncparks.gov/why-the-black-river-so-special

That is such a gorgeous area! My family has spent countless summers at White Lake and I've hiked all through these nature preserves. Such a shame to see the beautiful natural beauty of this amazing state in such danger. I do believe there is a similar ghost forest situation happening in the mountains thanks to acid rain :noparty: 

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NCgaga
38 minutes ago, HuffsAhoy said:

That is such a gorgeous area! My family has spent countless summers at White Lake and I've hiked all through these nature preserves. Such a shame to see the beautiful natural beauty of this amazing state in such danger. I do believe there is a similar ghost forest situation happening in the mountains thanks to acid rain :noparty: 

Acid rain has been an issue for decades on mountains that are above 5500 feet, unfortunately. Also a disease has threatened a lot of the Hemlocks that grow in the mountains of western NC. Scientist are actively working on the disease issue. 

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